Blog
Privacy
5465

Internet Safety for Parents and Students / Children

While much of the focus on Internet safety is on our children, a lot of what they learn may come from the habits of their parents.  I had the pleasure to speak to a group of parents, and then a group of 7th and 8th grade students, at Rosarian Academy …

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Uncategorized
3587

Will Your Law Firm Accept Bitcoin?

The concept of bitcoin, a virtual online currency, has been in the news in 2011.  The good news is that it has been somewhat stable, received media attention, and survived an attempted hack (arguably better than major corporations and some nations).  The bad news is that it remains a shadow-currency …

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iOS
3708

Using iPhone Location Data in Discovery

Remember the “news” that our smartphones are tracking user locations and storing them in files on the phone?   This article discusses how the iPhone accumulates and stores location data — and how it can be obtained by lawyers in civil cases. Originally published in the Trial Advocate Quarterly, Volume …

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Social Media
5274

(Intermediate) Facebook for Lawyers & Law Firms: Ethics, Jury Selection, Marketing, Fan Pages

In 2011, the Palm Beach Bar Association hosted “Intermediate Facebook for Lawyers & Law Firms,” a seminar regarding Facebook: 1.  Current legal ethics issues; 2.  How to use Facebook and social media for jury selection; 3.  Facebook marketing for lawyers; and 4.  How to set up a Facebook fan page …

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Privacy
3643

Do You Want LinkedIn to Use Your Profile in Their Ads?

Didn’t think so.  But their services agreement automatically opts you in. Here’s the fix: 1.  Log in.  Click on your name in the upper right corner.  Select “Settings” 2.  Find and click on “Account” in the lower right corner. 3.  Select “Manage Social Advertising.” 4.  The box is likely checked.  …

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iOS
5038

Lawyers Should Turn Off “Sent From My [Smartphone]”

Lawyers, and really anyone, should pay attention to whether their smartphone is appending “sent by my iPhone”-type messages at the bottom of business emails.  It’s an unnecessary advertisement for someone else’s product in your communication AND sends a variety of poor messages. Don’t believe it?  Read this article, from the …

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E-discovery
2516

Digital Photos Have Metadata Too

Lawyers and businesses overlyfocused on e-discovery often raise interest in other parties’ metadata (as well as concern about their own).  Good practices call for companies and firms to scrub email attachments before sending.  But digital photos are often forgotten and, worse, overlooked by common scrubbing software.   Even in our …

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Uncategorized
3468

Sending Large PDF Documents by Email

Lawyers (and others) often send emails with large PDF and other attachment. This article from the May 2011 Palm Beach Bar Bulletin will give you some tips and tricks to get around firewalls and other e-barriers.  

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Uncategorized
4414

South Park’s Use of WWIB Video Deemed Fair Use

A Wisconsin federal court judge dismissed a case against the makers of South Park where the plaintiff had alleged a copyright violation of its use of an Internet viral video, What What in the Butt.  In the April 2008 episode, “Canada on Strike,” character Butters Stotch “replicates parts of the …

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Uncategorized
3353

Sending Large PDF Documents by Email

Have you run across the situation where you want to email PDFs, video or image files but they get caught in either the sender’s or recipient’s filter because the attachments are too large? Problem solved. This article from the May 2011 Palm Beach County Bar Association Bulletin explains how to …

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Ethics
1796

Smart Lawyers, Dumb Passwords

Do you use passwords such as “password,” “loveyou,” or 1234567?  Apparently most of us do.  Even if you have a pretty good password plan for multiple Internet accounts, check out this month’s article, “Smart Lawyers, Dumb Passwords” in the Palm Beach County Bar Association Bulletin (April 2011).

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Uncategorized
4961

Ninth Circuit Rules in Facebook Case (but wait, is there more?)

The Ninth Circuit federal court released its decision in Facebook v. ConnectU, the lawsuit made famous by the 2010 movie, The Social Network, regarding the creation of Facebook and the litigation it spawned.  The full decision is here.  The news coverage (already clocking in at over 800 stories in four …

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Ethics
4371

The Woes of Citing Wikipedia in Court Pleadings

In a federal court case out of Kentucky, defense counsel reportedly cribbed portions of the brief from… Wikipedia.  And then from a Federal Judicial Handbook.  Both times without proper citation. Before getting to the orders, we note the case has the narrowest connection to Florida. In a February 2011 order, …

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Uncategorized
3601

Is there a law against posting photos and tagging people on Facebook?

A Kentucky court, in an unpublished divorce case opinion, held that under the circumstances of that case, there was “nothing within the law that requires [a party’s] permission for the photographs to be published in that manner.”  See Lalonde v. Lalonde.  Case did not address other potential concerns over distributing …

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Uncategorized
3842

Internet Marketing for Young Lawyers

Special thanks to the ABA Young Lawyer which ran a short article, Internet Marketing for Young Lawyers, in their April 2010 edition, available here.  Unfortunately, it is only available to ABA members and subscribers so I cannot link it here.   I can hint that suggestions included making your bio …

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