Christopher Hopkins “Anatomy of an Internet Defamation Case” at University of Miami Law School

1st Amendment

I am pleased to discuss “Anatomy of an Internet Defamation Case” with Professor Jan Jacobowitz‘s Social Media & the Law class at the University of Miami Law School.

In this presentation, we briefly discuss Elonis v. United States and we analyze the claims, defenses, and potential strategies of a pending internet defamation case here in Florida.

For the briefs and court opinions in Elonis, look here.

My March 2015 article on the Elonis case is here.

For news on Elonis’ recent acquittal in another matter, the news story is here.

The “Anatomy of an Internet Defamation Case” powerpoint is here: 2016 Anatomy

See this prior post regarding the Fourth District’s January 2016 case, Blake v Giustibelli.

 

 

Image credit: Journalismfestival.com

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