Can Your Clients Be Convicted for Threats on Social Media?

1st Amendment

A Florida high school student posted online, “Can’t WAIT to shoot up my school.”  “It’s time” and “School getting shot up on a Tuesday.”

He was arrested for violating Florida Statute 836.10 (“written threats statute”).  Then he was convicted.  But the appellate court reversed.

You can read the Florida Second DCA opinion in J.A.W. v. Florida.

This December 2016 article, published in the Palm Beach Bar Bulletin, explains Florida’s law regarding threats and how it applies to social media and online statements.

The article is here.

Image credit: Independent Journal Review

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