Can Your Clients Be Convicted for Threats on Social Media?

1st Amendment

A Florida high school student posted online, “Can’t WAIT to shoot up my school.”  “It’s time” and “School getting shot up on a Tuesday.”

He was arrested for violating Florida Statute 836.10 (“written threats statute”).  Then he was convicted.  But the appellate court reversed.

You can read the Florida Second DCA opinion in J.A.W. v. Florida.

This December 2016 article, published in the Palm Beach Bar Bulletin, explains Florida’s law regarding threats and how it applies to social media and online statements.

The article is here.

Image credit: Independent Journal Review

Legal Ethics (presented by Christopher Hopkins) at NBI Estate Administration Boot Camp

A special thank you to NBI for inviting me to speak about legal ethics at their “Estate Administration Boot Camp” in Hollywood, Florida this year. There is still time to register or get the audio CLE, here. Some (unusual) ethical issues we covered: Statistics on Florida Bar disciplinary actions (what …

Application of Law to Emerging Technology (at Florida Atlantic University)

Thanks to Professor Larry Buck for inviting me to speak to his Law in the Real World class  at FAU about the Application of Law to Emerging Technology. We discussed several cases and scenarios where lawyers and judges are called upon to apply longstanding legal principles to emerging technologies, such …

Data Breach
Accessing Someone Else’s Facebook Account in Florida is a Crime

Relying upon a statute which has been amended twice since 1978, it is a crime in Florida to access someone else’s social media account without their authorization.  This likely happens dozens of times a day in this state, likely as a joke or a prank, which have or could lead …