Can a Court Order Someone to Stay Off Your Website? (Facebook v. Power Ventures says yes)

Data Breach

In Facebook v. Power Ventures, Inc. et al., the Ninth Circuit held that it was a violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986 for the defendant to continue to access Facebook’s site after receiving a cease and desist letter from Facebook: “a defendant can run afoul of the CFAA when he or she has no permission to access a computer or when such permission has been revoked explicitly.”

The Court granted relief under both federal and state law.

photo credit: Independent.co.uk

Data Breach
Christopher Hopkins Presents Keynote Cybersecurity Presentation at Florida Dispute Resolution Conference

Special thanks to the Florida Dispute Resolution Center and the 1,000+ attendees at this year’s ADR: Options and Opportunities (27th annual) Conference. My keynote address covered various forms of cybersecurity risks (not just for mediators) including phishing, spearfishing, WiFi Pineapple man in the middle attacks, DDOS attacks, physical attacks, and …

1st Amendment
Three Steps to Understanding Why Government Officials Cannot Block Users on Social Media (Knight First Amendment Institute et al. v. Donald J. Trump et al.)

There is some confusion about the recent Second Circuit opinion as to how, on a private social media platform, a government official, using a personal account, cannot block other users. The following three step process should lead just about everyone to understand the outcome. The case is Knight First Amendment …

Internet
When You See People Trying to Sue a Social Media Platform Because Their Account Was Suspended, It’s a Stunt (lessons of the CDA & Brittain v. Twitter)

A number of politicians, activists, and others who feel aggrieved after their Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and/or YouTube content has been removed or their accounts suspended have taken to the courts to sue the social media platforms with claims that they are being singled out, muzzled, or their free speech is …