Google Using Your Photo in Ads? Turn Off “Shared Endorsements”

 

New terms and conditions going into effect on November 11, 2013 for Google Plus members will permit Google to use your photo in ads.

Here’s how to turn it off:

The following is long but I’m assuming you haven’t used Google Plus since you signed up!

1.  Log into your Google / Gmail / Google Plus account (it’s all the same)

2.  go to plus.google.com  (this is your Google+ homepage)

3.  On the left, find the “Home” tab.  Put your mouse on it.  Scroll down to “Settings.”

4.  The third bold section is “Shared Endorsements” — hit edit.

5.  Scroll down and un-check the box, “Based on my activity, Google may show my name and profile photo….”

6.  Hit “save.”

7.  On the same page, scroll back up and hit “Back to Account Settings” in top left.

8.  Check to make sure Shared Endorsements is “off” (if it isn’t, you likely did not save in steps 4-6).

9.  You’re done.

 

1st Amendment
Three Steps to Understanding Why Government Officials Cannot Block Users on Social Media (Knight First Amendment Institute et al. v. Donald J. Trump et al.)

There is some confusion about the recent Second Circuit opinion as to how, on a private social media platform, a government official, using a personal account, cannot block other users. The following three step process should lead just about everyone to understand the outcome. The case is Knight First Amendment …

Internet
When You See People Trying to Sue a Social Media Platform Because Their Account Was Suspended, It’s a Stunt (lessons of the CDA & Brittain v. Twitter)

A number of politicians, activists, and others who feel aggrieved after their Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and/or YouTube content has been removed or their accounts suspended have taken to the courts to sue the social media platforms with claims that they are being singled out, muzzled, or their free speech is …

Injunction
Casual Sexual Relationships and Florida’s Injunction Against Dating Violence (versus other injunctions)

When seeking an injunction in Florida to prevent someone from contacting you, pay careful attention to which statute best applies. This is the (unfortunate) lesson of Tyler Sumners v. Lindsey Thompson. After meeting on Craigslist, the parties had a four year consensual sexual relationship punctuated by periods of time when …